Doctor of Philosophy in Humanities

Doctor of Philosophy in Humanities

Faulkner University’s Honors College offers a Doctor of Philosophy for professionals hoping to enrich their higher education experience.

Program Objectives

The Doctor of Philosophy provides an academic path to a career in Christian education and offers a challenging opportunity to expand your mind and experiences through a worldly perspective. Diverse students bring new perspectives to program coursework, helping to facilitate engaging and challenging discussions.

Program Design

Rooted in the Great Tradition of the Western World, the curriculum for the Doctor of Philosophy program follows teachings from the Great Books of the Western Tradition to facilitate intellectual and spiritual engagement from students. Faulkner’s instructors are thought leaders who have proven credentials in the classroom, society and their field of research. Their Christian interpretation of philosophical studies and ideas help to facilitate collaborative and engaging discussion threads and conference calls.

The program includes:

  • A foundation course that examines the history and philosophy of humane learning.
  • Seven core courses providing an in-depth look at complex ideas and thoughts.
  • Three independent tutorials focused in your area of interest, including an author, idea(s), problem, theme, specific topic or historical era.
  • Two dissertation courses that are the pinnacle of this academic program.
  • Two interdisciplinary seminar courses.

The PhD program typically takes three to five years to complete, depending on students’ status (full-time or part-time) and the time taken to complete the dissertation.


Foundation Course (3 hours)

This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane learning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Ecclesiastes, Hugh of St. Victor’s Didascalicon, Dante’s Paradiso, John of Salisbury’s Metalogicon, Bruni’s The Study of Literature, Guarino’s A Program of Teaching and Learning, Vico’s On Humanistic Education, and Barzun’s House of Intellect. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
Core Courses (21 hours)

This course examines the history and philosophy of the nature the arts using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Aristotle’s Poetics, Augustine’s On Music, Goethe’s Poetry and Truth, Tolstoy’s What is Art?, Shaw’s Sanity of Art, Dewey’s Art as Experience, Adler’s Art and Prudence, Thiessen’s Theological Aesthetics: A Reader, and Scruton’s Beauty. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane Letters using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Job, Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Sophocles’s Oedipus the King and Antigone, Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Bradbury’s Dandelion Wine, and Wilbur’s Collected Poems. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines select historical works from a philosophical and historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Old Testament (Joshua–Esther), Herodotus’s Histories, Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War, Plutarch’s Lives, Tacitus’s Annals, Acts, Huizinga’s Waning of the Middle Ages, and Dawson’s Dynamics of World History. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines the history and philosophy of literary theory using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Psalms, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, Cicero’s De Oratore, Quintilian’s Institutio Oratori, Horace’s Ars Poetica, Longinus’s On the Sublime, Augustine’s On Christian Teaching, Dante’s Literature in the Vernacular, Sidney’s Apology for Poetry, and Blamires’s History of Literary Criticism. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines the history and philosophy of mathematical and scientific reasoning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Plato’s Meno, Euclid’s Elements, Archimedes’s On the Equilibrium of Planes, Nicomachus’s Introduction to Arithmetic, Ptolemy’s Almagest, Kepler’s Epitome of Copernican Astronomy, Galileo’s Two New Sciences, Bacon’s Novum Organum, Newton’s Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Huygens’s Treatise on Light, and Lavoisier’s Elements of Chemistry. Using weekly threaded discussions, biweekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines select philosophical works from a historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Proverbs, Plato’s Apology, Xenophon’s Apology, Aurelius’s Meditations, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, Aquinas’s Summa Theologica, Heidegger’s What Is Philosophy?, Sarte’s Existentialism Is a Humanism, and Polanyi’s Personal Knowledge. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course examines the history and philosophy of social thinking using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Proverbs, Plato’s Phaedo, Aristotle’s On the Soul, Plutarch’s Of Bashfulness, James’s Principles of Psychology, Freud’s A General Introduction to Psycho-analysis, Veblen’s Theory of the Leisure Class, Tawney’s Acquisitive Society, and Weber’s Essays in Sociology. Using weekly threaded discussions, biweekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
Interdisciplinary Seminars (6 hours)

This course consists of readings from a range of disciplines. Special attention is given to seeing connections and relationships between ideas, authors, and readings in this course. Interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary readers are used in this course. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.

This course consists of readings from a range of disciplines. Special attention is given to seeing connections and relationships between ideas, authors, and readings in this course. Interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary readers are used in this course. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
Independent Tutorials (9 hours)

This course is a focused study of an author, idea(s), problem, theme, specific topic, or historical era. The course will be designed between a student and tutor and will be approved by the Head of the College. Readings, intellectual goals, and research will be determined based on the student’s interests and course of study. The course can be taken four times (12 credit hrs. total) with different content.
Dissertation (6 hours)

The doctoral dissertation is the pinnacle of this academic program in Humane letters and learning. The dissertation must demonstrate serious engagement with the Great Tradition, manifest a broad understanding of the curriculum, and also show some level of unique interaction of the authors, ideas, and readings studied in the program.

Total Hours: 45

Prospective students who wish to enroll in the Doctor of Philosophy program must meet the following admission requirements:

  • A bachelor’s and master’s degree from an accredited institution. You must provide transcripts from all institutions attended.
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Acceptable graduate test score on graduate admissions exams, including the GRE (a combined verbal and quantitative score of 1000 or above) or MAT (400 or above) taken within the last 5 years.
  • Three letters of recommendation with specific comments regarding the applicant’s academic work, professional experience and ability to successfully complete graduate study. These letters are typically from the applicant’s previous instructors or supervisory personnel.
  • A statement of personal goals that identifies how the Doctor of Philosophy program will contribute to those goals (300 words).
  • Approval by the director of the Doctor of Philosophy program.
  1. Submit a completed online application.
  2. Complete and print the official transcript request form and fax it to 800.473.2512.
  3. Send all additional items via mail to your enrollment counselor.

Offering Schedule

Fall

FNA 8317 Examining Fine Arts: Great Ideas and Readings Tuesdays
HU 7311 Introduction to Humane Letters Mondays
HU 8310 Interdisciplinary Seminar Varies
LIT 7324 Literary Analysis: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings Thursdays
PHL 7313 Philosophical Inquiries: Great Ideas, Writings, and Authors Thursdays
8312, 8313, 8314 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/PHL/LIT) Varies
9301, 9302 Dissertation (HU/HY/PHL/LIT) Varies

Spring

HU 7310 Interdisciplinary Seminar Varies
HU 8326 Understanding Humane Letters: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings Mondays
HY 8315 Historical Investigations: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings Thursdays
NMS 8328 Mathematical Scientific Reasoning: Great Ideas and Readings Mondays
SSC 7319 Reflection on Social Scientific Thought: Great Ideas Readings Tuesdays
8312, 8313, 8314 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/PHL/LIT) Varies
9301, 9302 Dissertation (HU/HY/PHL/LIT) Varies

Summer

HU 8310 Interdisciplinary Seminar Varies
8312, 8313, 8314 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/PHL/LIT) Varies
Note: All live seminar meetings occur 7:30–9:00 pm (CT) via Google hangout video call.

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